The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
mountaineer cookie company's picture
mountaineer coo...


Alright as promised, here is the instructions for my Bagels.  I don't do the whole percentage thing, I am a by feel baker, so my flour measurements aren't set in stone.  First thing ya want to do is preheat your oven to 450 degrees.

 

1 1/2 cups water

1 1/2 tsp. sea salt

2 tsp. reg. instant yeast (not quick rise)

1 1/2 tsp. sugar

1 1/2 tsp. Barley malt syrup 

1 T. canola oil

 

Wisk above ingredients together till yeast is desolved  

 

 

 

Then kneed in 4 cups high gluten flour (I use king Arthur Sir Lancelot flour)  Use more or less, dough must be stiff.  I kneed dough in my Kitchen aid only till it comes together, then transfer it to the table where I kneed for about a minute then cover with plastic wrap for ten mins and kneed again, here is a before and after picture of my kneeding methods.  I kneed almost all my doughs this way, much easier on the wrist.

Before

After

Next shape into 4 and a 1/4 oz balls, it should make 8.  Then insert a small rolling pin or your finger and make a whole in the center and stretch into bagel like shape. see pictures.

Spray parparchment lined pan with pam.  Let sit for around 20 mins.  Meanwhile get your water ready

12 cups Water in a covered electric  skillet.

Large blob of malt syrup, sorry I don't measure this stuff, it's too sticky :)  Here is a picture of what I call a blob.

After bagels have proofed for 20 mins boil for 1 min. each side (do not start timing until water returns to a boil)  I do 6 at a time because I make about 4 times this size of recipe, but you could boil 4 at a time.  

Drain and add toppings at this point, try to work quickly in order to gain back shrinkage after boiling.  Place bagels on the same parchment lined pan the proofed on.  I suppose at this point you could bake them on a stone, I don't.  Bake them in a 450 degree oven for around 15 mins, more or less depending on how you like your crust.  Here is a picture of the finished product.

seseme

Asiago cheese (My Favorite)

I'm sure you can figure out the rest,  Happy Baking!!

 

 

paulav's picture

Fendu rolls

March 25, 2010 - 3:29pm -- paulav
Forums: 

When you press the center of a roll or loaf with a small dowel for final shaping, it is called a "fendu".  What is it called if you press it in opposite directions making 4 equal divisions?  Thanks, Paulav

ilan's picture
ilan

Hi 

Baguette is one of my favorite breads. For long sandwiches, with a full meal or just eat fresh with butter. One of the things I like about the Baguettes that I buy from the market is the very crisp crust and a very soft interior. It cannot be eaten without making a mess. But in this case, I really don’t care.

So, in the past, I made long roles using the same dough I used for bread: 3 cups of flour, 1.5 cups of liquid (2/3 parts milk), 1.5-2 teaspoons of yeasts, 1 teaspoon of salt 1 teaspoon of sugar, mix, kneed, rise, shape and bake. It was very good as roles, but the crust was different – softer. This is not a Baguette... but it took it as a a base for my experiments (a mistake, but i learned a lot back then)

I converted all the milk from the recipe to water and tried again. The crust was harder but I could not get the desired crunch.

Next I added steam in the first 10 minutes. Got a good progress with the crunch but something was missing.

Added more water - got a very soft interior with bigger holes. Still not what I looked for. 

So, I did some reading and came up to French dough recipe. Of course, how it eluded me… French bread is done with French dough, duh.

There I came across the preferment for the first time. The recipe I found included total of 3 1/4 cups of flour and 1 1/2 cups of water (now it looks too dry) and of course, no sugar.

It goes like this:

Preferment (15 hours in advance)

-       1 cups flour

-       2/3 cups of water

-       1/3 teaspoon yeast

The Dough:

-       2 1/4 cups flour

-       1 3/4 teaspoon yeast

-       3/4 cup of water

-       1 ¾ teaspoon of salt

 

After mixing the preferment with the rest of the ingredients and receiving a unified mass, i let it rest for 20 minutes, then kneaded it for about 10 minutes more. I let it rise for another 90 minutes, shaped it and let it rise for another 70 minutes before baking

I placed a pot of boiling water in the oven and let it continue to boil there before I entered the Baguettes inside and removed it 10 minutes after.

I admit, I didn’t fold the dough, it was not sticky so I skipped it. The dough itself was more slick then I was used to and stickier even though the amount of water was lower. 

Here are the results:

 

It was excellent, and all 3 got eaten the very day with help of my wife's sister and her boyfriend which is good sign for a baker/cook that he is doing something right.

After reading the tips for better French bread, I think I will try another batch (or 10) of these. I love the tenth tip - Practice!, and what comes after :)

 

Until the next post

Ilan

Martyn's picture

Brick oven book recommendations please

March 25, 2010 - 10:48am -- Martyn
Forums: 

My ambition is to build a brick wood fired oven in my back garden, can anyone recomend a good book with plans and building instructions. I plan to use as much reclaimed material as possible to keep the cost down, so it will take me a while to collect what I need. In the meantime, I need to read and to plan my adventure.

Thanks in advance,

Martyn

jennyloh's picture

Baking Stone & Bannetons - Any place in Charlotte, NC that I can get?

March 25, 2010 - 8:53am -- jennyloh

I'd be going to US,  and researching to get a stone and perhaps some bannetons as well from there, carry it back all the way here.....:) (hopefully it won't break along the way).  How heavy does pizza baking stone weigh? Does anyone know if there's any place within Charlotte, NC, US that I can shop for some baking supplies?

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