The Fresh Loaf

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ananda

 


Semolina [Durum] Bread and Sourdough Seed Bread.


I've been home-based all Easter weekend, so I decided on Thursday that I would make an inroad into the Hamelman Challenge set up by Brian: see http://thebreadchallenge.weebly.com/


I've already done quite a bit on baguettes for the Lesaffre Cup I was involved in http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17118/competing-louis-lesaffre-cup  and I posted last weekend on the Horst Bandel Black Pumpernickel http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17254/horst-bandel039s-balck-pumpernickel


I'm posting all the production details and photographs below.   I haven't been totally faithful to Hamelman's formula, but will point out where and why at the relevant points.


Semolina [Durum] Bread


Hamelman, Jeffrey 2004 "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" New Jersey; John Wiley and Sons.  pp.135-136


 


Recipe and Formula:


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

"Sponge"

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

19.7

365

Water

13.8

255

Sugar

1.9

36

Biga Naturale [from stock]

34.9 [flour 20.6;

water 14.3]

644 [flour 380; water 264]

TOTAL

70.3

1300

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

"Sponge" from above

70.3

1300

Strong White Flour

29.85

550

Semolina

29.85

550

Water

33.5

620

Salt

1.8

33

Olive Oil

4.9

91

TOTAL

170.2

3144

Pre-fermented flour: 40.3%. Hydration: 61.6%

Method:

  • As you can see, the first change I made is that I used "Biga Naturale" in this recipe instead of a sponge.   Partly because I had some old biga in stock, partly because Alison, my  wife,  is happier if I can keep the bakers' yeasts out of the formula.  I had about 150g of biga in stock, so fed that to give me sufficient for the 644g needed for the recipe, plus some to keep back for another day.   I did this "élaboration" approx. 16 hours before making the "sponge".
  • The sponge was made at 28°C, but given 2½ hours to ripen.   It would have taken a little more than this, but was obviously active.   The original recipe specifies 1¼ hours, but it uses bakers' yeast.
  • The next change I made was that I used an "autolyse" technique with the semolina only.   Let me explain that the semolina I used would be quite different to the type the author would most likely be considering for his recipe.   I buy the semolina from a local miller in Northumberland.   It is coarse and gritty, and quite a bit more brown than the golden varieties sold in UK supermarkets.   I love it; it's a great way to use up some of the by-products from making this gentleman's very fine pizza/ciabatta flour.   I mentioned the Gilchesters Organic Flour in this post: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/15974/sour-dough-leaven-refreshment-and-ash-content  I wanted to try and maintain the hydration levels of the original formula [62%].   In order to do this I exchanged the durum used by Hamelman in the sponge for strong white flour.   Given the durum wheat used in the US will be a very hard grain, and the Gilchesters grain is grown in the North of England, which is hardly our "bread basket", you can maybe understand my switch.
  • The autolyse worked really well. The semolina is very coarse and unrefined, so a good soak allowed for plenty of absorption.
  • I mixed the dough by hand, achieving a DDT of 24°C, as required. The dough was strong, and I gave it plenty of work on the bench.
  • From there I followed the recipe directions, using 1½ hours bulk, with a stretch and fold at the mid-point.
  • I made 3 large loaves in bannetons and set aside for final proof.
  • I baked these breads after 2½ hours final fermentation, again, due to the biga, fermentation time was a good hour longer; I was happy with this. The oven had been pre-heated for nearly 2 hours, and I used steam by pouring boiling water onto a pan of hot stones. I set the bread at 240°C, dropped to 200 after 15 minutes, then to 180°C after 40 minutes for the remainder of the bake.
  • The finished loaves are pictured below. The largest loaf, pictured with the long fan cuts, actually weighed in at 1.4kg. I baked it nearly an hour, directly on the hot bricks in my oven. It was still ever-so slightly doughy on the very base when we came to eat it yesterday. Maybe I should have given the "sponge" an extra half hour afterall? Anyway; the taste is fabulous, and I am really happy to have learnt another use for the semolina I buy. Up until now it's only been used for dusting purposes!

 This is the semolina I used

Sourdough Seed Bread

Hamelman, Jeffrey 2004 "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" New Jersey; John Wiley and Sons.  pp.176-177

 

Recipe and Formula:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Liquid Levain

 

 

Strong White Flour

15

250

Water

19

315

Levain [from stock]

-

50 [flour 22;  water 28]

TOTAL

34

615 - 50 returned to stock = 565

 

 

 

Rye Sour [from stock]

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

7.8

130

Water

13

217

TOTAL

20.8

347

 

 

 

Soaker

 

 

Golden Flax Seeds

7

117

Water - boiling

21

350

TOTAL

28

467

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

Liquid Levain

34

565

Rye Sour

20.8

347

Hot Soaker

28

467

Strong White Flour

60.1

1000

Strong Wholemeal Flour

17.1

285

Toasted Sunflower Seeds

11.4

190

Toasted Sesame Seeds

6

100

Water

22

368

Salt

2 [1.6% inc seeds]

33

TOTAL

201.4

3355

Pre-fermented flour: 22.8%.   Hydration: 75% [64% including seeds]

Method:

  • Make the rye sour 16 hours ahead of making the final dough; DDT 21°C
  • Use one élaboration to make the levain needed, then make the levain 12 hours before making the final dough.   DDT 21°C
  • Make the hot soaker at the same time. Cover with cling film and leave to cool overnight. The original recipe uses a cold soaker.
  • Toast the sesame and sunflower seeds under the grill, turning as necessary, until lightly browned
  • Combine all the ingredients to form the final dough. Mix by hand for 10 minutes to achieve a well-developed dough of 24°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours, with one stretch and fold midway through this period.
  • Divide the dough into 3 equal sized pieces and mould round. Rest, covered for 10 minutes. Prepare 2 large bread tins, lined with shortening. Shape 2 loaves for the tins and pan them. Place the other piece upside down in a prepared banneton.
  • Prove overnight in the fridge at 8°C.
  • In the morning, pre-heat the oven for one hour whilst the loaves come back to room temperature. Use steam, by pouring boiling water onto a pan of hot stones.
  • Set the loaf in the banneton and bake that first. Then baked the 2 tinned loaves after that. Baking time will be 45 -50 minutes; set at 240°C, reduce the heat to 200°C after 15 minutes, then 180°C after 40 minutes for the remainder of the bake.

Variations here are as follows: I used rye sour rather than rye flour.   Hamelman's original formula utilises just 15% pre-fermented flour.   I wanted more than this, and will always seek to use rye in a pre-fermented form if possible.   Hydration level is as the original recipe.   I also used a small portion of wholemeal in the final dough, where Hamelman uses all-white flour.   The intensity of my baking session [I'd also made filo pastry for my wife to use to make Spanokopita for our Easter Monday visitors] meant I'd run out of white flour.   However, I was more than happy to use the wholemeal.   The final bread is not at all heavy, nor sour.   It is very "moreish", and is being eaten at quite a rate.

All good wishes

Andy

sonnenblume1984's picture

Sourdough

April 6, 2010 - 11:11am -- sonnenblume1984

In Richard Bertini Book CRUST hi writes about converting a Starter (50g Spelt,150g white 150g water, 20g honey) into a dry sourdough ferment and making granules whitch then can be re-activated. I have a ww motherstarter would that work the some way???


Sonnenblume

GloriouslyHomemade's picture

My first Preferment - YAY!

April 5, 2010 - 10:08pm -- GloriouslyHomemade

So, after spending hours and hours on this site, I decided to try my hand at pre-fermenting. I have a couple of tried-and-true sandwich bread recipes but I decided to be adventurous and converted a French bread recipe from Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book. I even tried shaping a batard!!!


 


The results of my efforts: crusty-chewy crust, robust flavor and a passable crumb in not-too-badly shaped football. :-) I couldn't be more thrilled! There is no way but up from here.


 


Next experiment: Rustic Bread.


 

BluesmanEP's picture

How to tell from a formula what the crumb *should* be like?

April 5, 2010 - 10:04pm -- BluesmanEP
Forums: 

Hello All,


I've been baking various types of bread at home for a while now, with pretty good success. My question is how to tell from a formula what the texture of the crumb should be? It is simply a question of hydration - a higher percentage of water will yield a dough with more holes and an open crumb, and a stiffer dough will yield smaller holes? Or is there a better way to tell?

Postal Grunt's picture

52 Loaves

April 5, 2010 - 9:52pm -- Postal Grunt
Forums: 

"52 Loaves" is the title of a book I found yesterday at a Barnes and Noble bookstore in Omaha, NE. It's written by William Alexander, the writer who did another book "The $64 Tomato" about his home gardening experiences. I haven't read the book but did skim enough of it that I thought it might be of interest to the community.

caviar's picture

Miche

April 5, 2010 - 4:11pm -- caviar

I was watching an unusual movie from on demand named Sring 1941. There was a scene that place in a Polish farmer home. The female farmer inserted a peel into an old oven in the wall and pulled out aloaf of bread htat looked like it must weigh 4 or 5 kilos and had a hich dome which I understand is not typical of a miche.


Does anyone have any recipe, instruction,comments on such a loaf.


 I thought the movie which took place in Poland in 1941 as the Nazi's invaded was a good movie but expect to do some crying especially at the end.    Herb

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