The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
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Marni's picture

Grain mill or food processor?

April 7, 2008 - 5:39pm -- Marni

Hello knowledgeable bakers- I do not own a grain mill, but do own a couple food processors.  In the past I have sometimes whirled some oatmeal to add to a recipe.  How is a grain mill different?  I'd like to grind some flax and quinoa,  I had thought of using a small coffee grinder (an unused one) but I'd get a grain mill if that's the best way to go.  Are they expensive, can I just pick one up at Bed, Bath and Beyond, and which one is the best?  Thanks for any input you can share.

Marni

CountryBoy's picture

Does this forum s/w have a utility for surveys?

April 7, 2008 - 2:58pm -- CountryBoy
Forums: 

While people are talking about chat s/w, I was wondering if it is possible to do surveys?  On many forums people can initiate surveys on their own on different topics.  For example, people on this forum...  http://www.diehards.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=2&sid=264448b0770ccffc704ffbac7766375f   ...do it quite often.

I am always interested in demographics of a group, just for fun.  Different topics that could be of interest are:

Rosalie's picture

Make-your-own Farina?

April 7, 2008 - 9:20am -- Rosalie
Forums: 

I've come across an interesting-looking pancake recipe that calls for farina (such as Cream of Wheat).  Wikipedia describes farina as "made from the germ and endosperm of the grain, which is milled to a fine granular consistency and then sifted."

I'm wondering how I can approximate it with my NutriMill.  This sounds to me a lot like first clear flour, but maybe a bit more granular.  If I grind my wheat to be a bit coarser than flour, and then put through an ordinary sifter, do you think this will this work? 

Rosalie

PaddyL's picture

Skim milk powder in my sourdough.

April 7, 2008 - 8:55am -- PaddyL

This is something I've never done before; I've just reconstituted some skim milk powder and added it to my sourdough.  And I've used corn oil instead of butter, and half the honey that's called for in the recipe.  I never thought I'd be so used to making sourdough that I'd actually make substitutions, or that I'd even know the recipe off by heart!  Just a few short weeks ago, I was very nervous about sourdough itself, and now I'm thinking of beginning another type of starter.  The dough certainly felt good in the knead, it's now resting, and I'm about to go back to it to finish the knead a

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

100% Whole Wheat boules


100% Whole Wheat boules


100% Whole Wheat boules Crumb


100% Whole Wheat boules Crumb

 

I had made the whole wheat bread from Reinhart's BBA a couple of time. i liked it a lot. It was, for me, the perfect bread for a tuna fish sandwich or a BLT.

 

I bought Reinhart's newer book, "Whole Grain Breads" a few months ago and read, with interest, the introductory chapters right away. Following his "journey" and the evolution of his thinking has been really interesting. But I had not baked anything from the new book until today. I decided to start with his "foundational loaf," the "100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread. As you can see, I decided to form 2 boules of around 1 pound each rather than making one sandwich loaf. 

 It's interesting that Reinhart's instruction have you hand knead this bread, even after a 2-3 minute machine kneading. This is a relatively dry dough. I hand kneaded it as instructed, maybe with an extra minute or two, and actually achieved window paning. That was a kick! 

 This bread is not really that different from the BBA version. The new formula uses milk (I used buttermilk.) in the soaker. The BBA whole wheat uses water. The BBA bread has an egg in it which the WGB bread does not. The end result is actually quite similar. I suspect that baking boules rather than pan loaves made as much difference as the different ingredients.

 

The crust felt a little soft, even after an extra 10 minutes left in the oven, but it crunched nicely when I bit into it. The bread has a pronounced whole wheat flavor but with many layers of flavor including sweetness that are lovely.

 

I bet this will make delicious toast for breakfast, even with competition from the banana bread from Crust & Crumb that I also baked today. 

 

David 

 

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