The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
ronhol's picture

Buttercream Icing

October 17, 2010 - 7:50pm -- ronhol

I'm looking for a killer butter cream icing recipe.


When I was a kid, we had a German lady living across the street who made the worlds best butter cream frosting.


Mildly sweet, rich and creamy, to die for.


I saw one somewhere recently, I thought it was on this board, but search did not render it.


I thought it was on the homemade chocolate cake thread, which I cannot find either.


Any help would be appreciated!

Experimental Baker's picture

will weather affect countertop starter?

October 17, 2010 - 3:49pm -- Experimental Baker

i recently moved to a cooler location and fall has set in.  i know that putting the starter in the fridge will cause it to retard, but i use it constantly, and i dont want to retard it if i can help it, but with this weather...


my question is this: what is the degree to which colder (60 to 70 and hopefully no colder *burrr*) degree weather affects the effectiveness/yeast growth of the starter, and how will this affect bread when i go to make it?  is there something i should change or alter due to weather?

ggage's picture

brand new n-50

October 17, 2010 - 3:29pm -- ggage

I am getting tired of trying to find a good used n-50 and am thinking of just ordering a new one. question is a' are the new ones made as well now as in years past ?? I sort remember someone mentioning something about quality . have the bowls changed over the last years?


Also I'm in Canada and know hobart used to make mixers in Canada as well as Ohio ,is or was there a quality difference ?   Thanks Gage

clazar123's picture

Need some holiday suggestions

October 17, 2010 - 2:38pm -- clazar123
Forums: 

I have some lovely cannisters/jars that I want to give away at Christmas and I want to fill them with goodies  that are NOT cookies. I will start baking Dec 1 and will be giving them away Dec 26th. I want to avoid butter/solid fat and high amounts of sugar/sweetener in the recipes but I don't mind using oil,some sugar/sweetener. I am looking for both mildly sweet and also savory ideas.


So, biscotti is one idea,both sweet and savory.


Crackers?


Italian torelli and such?


Bread sticks?


 

AnnaInMD's picture

Ceramic Grill

October 17, 2010 - 2:36pm -- AnnaInMD

The cat's meow ?  I saw this awsome ceramic grill at Lowe's today. Talk about being able to bake with steam outdoors ! The inside was unglazed clay and offers many ways of cooking, steaming, baking, grilling, roasting and all with charcoal.  The link here shows it from another vendor:


 

jrudnik's picture

AB&P Brioche Help

October 17, 2010 - 1:36pm -- jrudnik

Hi,


This weekend I decided to try some AB&P Brioche. I have made Brioche from Tartine before, and assumed this would be fairly easy, as it appeared to be less labour intensive. So I mixed the dough last night, put it in the fridge and shaped around 11 o'clock this morning. The only problem is, they have risen just barely or not at all. I am making 1 loaf in a standard size pan with 2 lb. of dough. Should I let this keep rising? Criticism is accepted!


Thanks!

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Sports fans are notoriously superstitious.  Whatever they do on the day of a big win somehow becomes the cause of that win, and must be repeated in order to assure the next win.  So, I guess I have to bake Babka again today, Tuesday and Wednesday or the Giants are bound to face defeat.  Well...if they don't make it to the World Series, I'll take the blame cuz one Babka bake is enough for now. Yesterday, my first attempt at Babka (Chocolate-Cinnamon-Pecan) led to a thrilling one-run win in the Giants first NLCS game against the Phils.


Babka preparation is quite a big deal.  As Emperor Joseph II might have said to Mozart if he were a baker, there are just too many ingredients.  (No, I'm not comparing myself to Mozart; when he was my age, he'd been dead for 20 years).  Flour, yeast, salt, milk, butter, egg yolks, sugar, cinnamon, vanilla, grated baker's chocolate, sugar, butter, pecans, flour, sugar, butter....and butter and sugar. There are also lots of steps.  But the results are worth the effort.


IMG_1689


IMG_1694


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Now that I've mashed together themes from Baseball and Classical Music, here's the recipe, an adaptation from Glezer, as told by Stan Ginsburg:



Cinnamon-Chocolate-Pecan Babka (Adapted from Glezer via Stan Ginsburg)


Makes 3 loaves.


Dough Ingredients (measured in ounces)


BreadFlour 36  


WholeMilk 17.25


Unsalted butter 6.75 


Egg Yolks, large 2.5 - approximately 4 yolks


Sugar 9.75  


Instant Yeast 1.0 


Salt 0.25 


Vanilla Extract 0.65 


Ground Cinnamon  .30


Filling Ingredients 


Sugar 11.5  (1 ½ cup)


Unsweetened baker’s chocolate, grated 4.50 (1 ½ cup)


Toasted and chopped Pecans,   8.0 (2 cup)


Unsalted butter, melted (also for greasing pans)   6.00 (1 ½  stick)


Streusel Ingredients


Bread Flour 3.0


Sugar 1.50 


Unsalted butter, room temp 1.50 


Method



  1.   Warm the milk to 105-110 degrees F.  Stir instant yeast into milk. Meanwhile, melt the butter for dough and allow to cool.

  2.  Add half (18 oz) of the flour to milk and yeast and mix until smooth. Allow to ferment about 30 min, until very foamy and volume triples.

  3.  Add remaining ingredients and blend using hands. Knead in the bowl until gluten forms and dough comes away from sides of bowl. This is a very rich, slack dough and it will take time for the gluten to form, but it will happen, so be patient.

  4.  Allow to ferment 45-60 min, until more than doubled in bulk and very gassy. Grease three loaf pans with butter. Turn dough out onto a generously floured board and pat firmly  to degas. Divide the dough into six pieces (two for each loaf).

  5.  Roll the first piece of dough into a very thin sheet, preferably less than 1/4". Using a silicon mat helps. Otherwise, make sure you have enough flour on hand to prevent sticking. When you finish rolling the first sheet, brush it with melted butter and sprinkle it evenly with one sixth of the sugar,  chocolate and pecans. Roll it into a spiral, jelly-roll style. Repeat for other five pieces of dough.

  6.  Preheat your oven to 325 and set rack in lower third of oven. Twist two rolls of dough together to form a double helix, a/k/a a spiral, and arrange in the pan.  Repeat for other two loaves.  Allow to proof for 30-45 minutes, until the dough extends above the rim of the pan.

  7.  Brush top of babka with melted butter. Blend flour, sugar and softened butter into a coarse mixture and sprinkle generously on top. Bake for 45-55 minutes, until loaf is a rich, dark brown and it sounds hollow when tapped with a finger. Remove from oven and allow to cool in the pan for about 10 minutes before tapping it out onto a rack to finish cooling for an hour.

  8. After cooled, enjoy Babka during final innings of Giants' victory.


These Babkas are a delicious moist coffee cake, not too sweet.  The only change I'd make is to add cinnamon to the filling as well as the dough.


Go Giants!  Go Nuts!


Glenn

Submitted to YeastSpotting (http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/)

Neo-Homesteading's picture
Neo-Homesteading

 


  


 


Recently my family visited quiet valley living historical farm in stroudsburg, pa. Although we went there for the "craft festival" it was the oven that really captured my attention. I talked with the ladies running the oven briefly and had a brief conversation about how I'm in the process of building my own oven. Well actually its been a few years in progress now. I was amazed at how well their oven looked and how well maintained it is. It really motivated me to want to finish my own.


So far, We dug a 4x4 foot hole, filled it back up, made the foundation with cinder blocks... filled the center with sand, purchased fire brick and now its still sitting there. I based everything off of what I read in kiko denzers book but something I really had an issue with was all of the rocks and trying to find the perfect soil to build with. While talking to the ladies at the historical farm I almost got the impression that rocks are ok? It was just a brief conversation however now I'm somewhat baffled. Dont rocks explode when they are heated? Living in the pocono mountains finding the perfect clay to use for my oven just seems impossible. Has anyone else done this in a similar environment? I'm really hoping to finish my bread oven soon, hopefully before the snow hits this season. I'm wondering if a masonry oven might be a better way to go however I did have my heart set on a cob style earth oven. Any helpful advice appreciated! For more on the historical farm please see my blog post. 


 


External Link to post: http://neo-homesteading.blogspot.com/2010/09/quiet-valley-living-historical-farm.html


 

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