The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts
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tonyjacobs's picture

Simple coconut macaroons in minutes

March 21, 2010 - 10:45am -- tonyjacobs

1 beaten egg
50g caster sugar
30g icing sugar (sifted)
145g unsweetened desiccated coconut

Preheat fan oven to 170

Beat sugar into egg with a fork, add icing sugar, then add coconut and mix well. 

Spoon some of the mixture into a small dish (approx 1.5 inches diameter), press in gently, and then turn out onto a greased baking tray, leaving a small mound shaped macaroon. This recipe makes around 14 macaroons.

Bake for approx 14 minutes until golden. Leave to cool on wire rack.

Tony

Smita's picture
Smita


Notes:


- Used my 100% hydration starter.


- Two builds to reach 8 oz active starter. The starter smelled fruity, not sour. Bubbles about half a centimeter big.


- Final dough: 2 cups whole wheat flour (365 from Whole Foods) and under 1 cup AP flour (King Arthur), 1 tsp wheat gluten. 


- For DDT of 76 degrees, added 1.5 cups water at about 90 degrees.


- 30 minute autolyse. Kneaded till windowpane.


- 45 minute rise, stretch and fold, 60 minute rise.


- Shaped into boule, plopped into floured banneton. Overnight retard (10 hours).


- Baked at 450 in Le Cruset (15 mins), turned oven down to 440 (20 mins), lid off (10 mins). Total = 45 mins.


- Internal temperature = 200 degrees.


 


Results:


- Lovely crumb and crust. We like this a lot, in terms of flavor and whole wheat flour content.


- My goal is to be able to make this consistently, and also get better at shaping.


- I would also like to introduce diastatic malt and see if I can decrease the AP flour. Need to do some reading from Hamelman's Bread in preparation.


- All comments and feedback welcome!

Smita's picture
Smita


Easily the best non-sourdough loaf I have ever made. Followed instructions to the letter.


What surprised me the most was how incredibly light the loaf was. Very good for morning toast. Best within 3-4 days. Thank you Peter Reinhart and BBA!


 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Just recently, Mariana-Aga, a fellow baker who I have great respect for and who is an occasional poster here, presented a very interesting paper with extensive photos on the development of gluten. For the purposes of her research and documentation she used a food processor to mix and develop, then over develop the dough. All of the various stages are carefully documented and you can see the tell tale signs of the dough being over worked and ruined.


 This experiment shows what over kneading will do to your dough. It is also possible to over develop your dough by simply over fermenting it, either at room temperature or in the refrigerator. We have all had a dough turn slack and sticky from not being attended to in the proper time.In fact unless you use a food processor, it is very hard to mechanically over develop or over mix your dough at home. The mixers most home bakers use are not capable of over mixing unless you take a long nap while mixing.


If you don't learn anything more from this great post other than to finally know that there is no fixing it if you get in this situation. I have tried adding more flour to the extreme, and it never works. You may as well resign yourself that this will never be right and toss it in the compost.


If you have seen this, you know what I'm talking about!


And finally, I learned a nice trick for cleaning that unbelievably sticky gooey dough mess from my bowls and hands. This alone is reason enough to visit this very informative blog post by Mariana.. I hope some of you find it as interesting as I have.


Eric


PS: This page is written in Russian. Google Translate had no trouble translating to English.

rsherr's picture

Making a lid for oven spring to cover bread while baking

March 21, 2010 - 7:42am -- rsherr

I've seen a number of posts on covering bread for the first part of baking to trap the steam.  Some people use roaster covers or other lids.  My stone is 14 1/2 inches by 15 1/2 inches and I don't have any lids that will fit and still cover the loaves.  Has anyone sculpted a lid out of tin foil or other material that would work?  Or are you using larger stones? Or anyone have a better idea on how to accomplish this?

Zeb's picture
Zeb

I hope this is ok to do this as I can't find the posts I wanted to add these too as I am new here.  Yesterday I made these breads, a yeasted dough cottage loaf, following Elizabeth David's method (first time I have ever baked a loaf from a cold start!)  and the pain de sielge d'auvergne, I think its lineage goes as follows, Daniel Leader, LeadDog and Mick of Bethesdabakers, thank you all for this recipe -  and my usual Pain de Campagne.  


Anyway I wanted to share the photos with you. The rye burst at the side because I wasn't sure whether or not to slash the top, obviously I should have done.


Sun shining here in Bristol!  all the best Zeb (on the internet nobody knows you're a dog!)





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